Phase II Approval Will Fund the Construction of the City of Long Beach’s Critical Infrastructure Flood Protection System

 Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that the Federal Emergency Management Agency has approved over $20 million in federal funding under the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program for the City of Long Beach’s flood protection project. This vital project will strengthen major infrastructure and provide flood protection in the City of Long Beach located in Nassau County. 

“The devastation from Hurricane Sandy is still felt today in Long Beach, and it is crucial that we provide this community with the assistance it needs to strengthen its infrastructure against future storms,” Governor Cuomo said. “This funding will not only help Long Beach continue its recovery, but also ensure its resiliency as we face extreme weather events that have become all too common.”

This project will protect critical utility lines along the northern shore of the City of Long Beach by constructing new steel bulkheading and backfill with clean, upland fill; constructing an armored slope around the existing natural gas pipeline; installing tangent pile bulkhead adjacent to the Long Beach Boulevard bridge abutments; and constructing a 33 million gallon per day pump station and stormwater infrastructure upgrades to mitigate acres of coastal zone tidal wetlands.

FEMA has reserved an amount not to exceed $20,060,327 with a 100 percent Federal Share, for the construction portion of the project. Approximately $1.6 million was previously awarded for engineering and design work and $18,482,327 has been reserved for final engineering and construction. The project is expected to be completed by October of 2021.

FEMA has approved these projects under its Hazard Mitigation Grant Program which allows the state to establish priorities aimed at increasing the state’s resiliency, mitigating the risks of loss and damage associated with future disasters, and reducing hardship. After Superstorm Sandy devastated parts of New York, Governor Cuomo called for government and non-profit organizations across the state to submit applications for projects to help communities become more resilient, rebuild smarter, stronger and more sustainable communities in the wake of recent natural disasters.

“It is crucial that we protect the critical infrastructure in our communities and this funding for the City of Long Beach will go a long way to harden this infrastructure and lessen the impacts of severe storms and flooding,” said DHSES Commissioner Roger L. Parrino, Sr. “I want to thank FEMA, and our state and local elected officials for their partnership in moving this vital project forward.”

Congresswoman Kathleen Rice said, “As we continue to see extreme weather events like never before, it is critical that we strengthen our infrastructure so that it can withstand whatever Mother Nature brings our way. This funding will allow our community to ease the impact of heavy rains and flooding, and improve roads and bridges to better weather year-round storms. I applaud Governor Cuomo for securing this funding to help keep New Yorkers safe.”

Senator Todd Kaminsky said, “These critical measures to address serious flooding issues in Long Beach will make a real difference. Long Beach’s future is dependent upon its ability to control flooding and keep water out of its community. I applaud Governor Cuomo for his advocacy for this project and know that it is just one step in the many that need to be taken to protect the north side of the Long Beach Barrier Island.”

About the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services    
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Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services (DHSES) provides leadership, coordination and support for efforts to prevent, protect against, prepare for, respond to, and recover from terrorism, man-made and natural disasters, and other emergencies. For more information, visit the DHSES Facebook page, follow @NYSDHSES on Twitter and Instagram, or visit dhses.ny.gov.

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